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Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)
of these fiscal cliff talks that are causing such volatility in the market here? >> well, bill, as you said, we are long-term investors. we really don't find ourselves wanting to move things around that much. >> you're not playing these swings here? you don't buy on dips? >> we're not playing the dips and selling the volleys. >> are you expecting that we will be able to get into this market as better prices at lower prices at some point before year end? >> that would be a very short-term question. i don't know the answer to it. >> and you're not a short-term guy. >> eric, what about you? how are you allocating capital these days? >> you know, we're allocating capital much the same way we have been doing for the last few months, which is thinking, again, sort of long term like was just said. you can do things around the fringes, but they have to be, you know, considered a small move rather than something aggressive. we still don't have enough answers to know what the ultimate outcome is going to be. >> mark, what about you? you know, we tend to oversimplify. right now the feeling is resolution t
fiscal cliff talks with the white house. on capitol hill for one day at least, all was pretty quiet. posturing and finger pointing kind of stopped. cnn political reporter shannon travis joins us now live from washington. what's the the latest on the talks or the silence? >> the silence seems to be golden, john. remember last week when all the players involved seem to be posturing and positioning and talking about negotiations? not so much, at least in the past few days. we know president obama and house speaker john boehner had a one-on-one meeting, right, on sunday, their first since mid-november. what were the details from that meeting and from the ongoing discussions? they're not really -- both sides are not really being forthcoming with what the substance of those conversations, both sides yesterday, the white house and the republican leadership put out statements. they're essentially the same. i'll read just one from boehner's press secretary. discussions with the white house are taking place but we have no detail to share about the substance of those conversations. the republi
is in transportation, too -- we are mired in conversations about the fiscal cliff. we are talking about long-term infrastructure, a long term energy plan. >> this is the perfect opportunity for the government to work together to achieve a common goal. there is plenty of times when our interest might not call last with the interest of either of the parties. this is the opportunity we have never had before. you could have consumer, business, and the government's all working together to take advantage of this huge resource. for us, it makes so much sense because it makes business sense. we get about $1.65 a quilt when natural gas. from the government point of view, everybody is talking about jobs and the fiscal cliff. everyone talks about taxes and what is going to happen with the fiscal cliff. there has been $1500 gone to increase oil prices. you can get them that tax cut today if you invested in our report. everybody talks about entitlements. high oil prices make the social security trust insolvent five years sooner than they would if he did not have high oil prices. america needs jobs and gr
made in talk toes avoid the u.s. fiscal cliff. another top republican lawmakers offers an olive branch to the white house. >>> and sylvia berlusconi accuses the current premier as being german-centric. >>> and the dfw returns to a new year high. >> you're watching "worldwide exchange." bringing us business news from around the globe. >>> 13220 is the level of the dow. the nasdaq is trying to add five of six points. we're seeing a bit of a rebound shaping up here in the red. the ftse global 300 is up about .2%. for the most part, it's all green across europe. the ftse 1100 adding .2%. the xetra dax and cac 40 in germany, paris, better than .5%. up 1% after falling double that yesterday. we're seeing gains in italy and portugal, ross, as invest everies have now perhaps priced in the latest turmoil in italy. >> absolutely. meanwhile, unemployment may have ticked down 7..7%. 10.9% for those aged 18 to 29 and this one saying they're struggling to fill vacancies because of a lack of suitable skills. this all according to our next guest who just completed a survey about youth unemployment and
republican bob corker and other members of congress talking about this fiscal cliff. hosted by bloomberg government and the lloyd. this is about an hour. -- and deloitte. this is about an hour. >> good morning. i'm the head of bloomberg government. thank you for joining us today, and thank you to deloitte for partnering with us in this event. when we launched bloomberg government just about two years ago, we had the aspiration of creating a one-stop shop, with data, tools, news, and analysis to help government affairs and government sales professionals make better and faster decisions. we went a long way toward achieving that aspiration. a big part of it is conversations on the important issues that face our nation today, particularly at the intersection of business and government. today's discussion on the fiscal cliff clearly meets that. we are honored to have such a thoughtful panel. senator mark warner, senator bob corker, congressman chris van hollen, governor tim pawlenty, who is currently president and ceo of the financial services roundtable. moderating our discussion today is al
. >>> talks between the white house and republicans over the fiscal cliff are grinding to a hold. house speaker john boehner dealing with division in the gop's ranks to his budget plan. we've got a shanghai surprise. china's mainland markets up over nearly 3% after beijing's new leaders called for economic stability and new business growth. and it looks like more austerity for britain. george osborne getting ready to release his autumn statement. >>> nokia shares a little bit high today. they are teaming up with china mobile, giving access to the world's biggest mobile phone markets. >>> if you just got up, very warm welcome to the start of your global trading day. stocks are on the front foot this morning. this is where we stand with u.s. futures. currently called up around about 30 points higher. the dow down, what, 13 points? the nasdaq called up just under 40 points. the s&p 500 at the moment is called up just over three points. it was down two points yesterday. european stocks doing a little built better. they were as flat as a pancake, as i've been saying. as flat as my pancakes.
off the fiscal cliff. let's take a look at currency markets. the dollar is also little change against the yen as u.s. budget talks continue. dollar/yen is in the upper 81 levels, 81.88 to 90. the euro, that is higher against the yen, 107.27 to 30 at the moment. worries are reseeding over eurozone debts. let's take a look at other markets in the apple open. kospi is trading flat on the day, 1,934. looking at australia, the benchmark index is trading higher by 1/10 of a percent, 4,508. modest moves so far this morning in the asia pacific. >>> japan and india launched a new framework to provide bilateral credit in u.s. dollars. the aim is to ease the impact of possible turmoil in the global financial markets on asia. the two countries worked out the details on tuesday. japan's prime minister and his indian counterpart had signed the currency agreement a year ago. under the framework both countries will be able to exchange up to $15 billion over the next three years. the two countries had a similar currency deal in 2008 when the global financial crisis hit asia. recently india's rupe has
the talks about the fiscal cliff. with that, gene sperling. [applause] >> thank you very much, neera. it is intimidating to have followed your panel. i like to be the first person and the panel says, "gene sperling says --" the president of harvard and glenn hutchins and susan molinari, who is down at google and partners with my life on issues of child trafficking. a special place in our home. i know a lot has already been said. i have been herded so i don't know if i'll be repeating it. i like to start by just reminding ourselves what is our end goal for economic policy because you hear a lot metrics on productivity and growth as it those were the ends in themselves. are we a nation in which the accident of your birth is not overly to determine the outcome of your life where there is a real chance for everybody to rise? are we an economy where growth strengthens? are we an economy and a country where people who work hard and take responsibility for their lives can work with dignity, raised her children with dignity, and retire with dignity? those are our ultimate goals. innovation c
of talk but didn't have impact on the stock market. i was here for that. the fiscal cliff has more impact, and it did today. i watched what the markets are doing today. today when bernanke was on, i saw interest rates move up, bond yields move up, highs for the day, and i saw stocks move down. that's kind of the opposite of what bernanke was wanting to have happen. >> right. >> and two things, guys, that did that. number one, he was questioned persistently about the fiscal cliff and had to come out and say what he said before we don't have the tools to deal with it if we go over it. that was a approximate stocks started moving down and secondly, the 6.5% unemployment rate. that's got a lot of people talking down here that we may be closer to that than a lot of people think. >> bob, that's only because people are leaving the workforce. that's how we're going to get there. if everybody decides to stop looking for work and stay home and watch soap operas then we'd have an unemployment rate of zero. >> that could be a factor in their decision making, i'm sure it will be, but i'm using the num
the fiscal cliff, but we brought him here today to talk about our long-term challenges and how we connect the dots, and our wide-ranging discussion helps set that up. with that, gene sperling. [applause] >> thank you very much, neera. it is intimidating to have followed your panel. i like much more when you get to talk first, be the first person to mention every idea, and then the panel's say, yes, as gene sperling said. [laughter] now i have to go after the president of harvard, jonathan marino, john hutchinson, susan molinari, who is partners with my wife on issues of child trafficking. she has a special place at our home. i know a lot has already been said. since i did not get to hear it all, i don't know whether i will be repeating it again. anyway, let me i'd like to start when we talk about economic policy, particularly in this area, by reminding ourselves, what is part of our goal for economic policy -- because you hear a lot of metrics on the gdp, on growth, on productivity, etc., as if those were the ends themselves --those are the means to our ends, and the ultimate goals of ec
to discuss legislation we could actually pass. i'm not talking about the fiscal cliff or sequester, anything quite so heavy. but, nevertheless, quite important. it's got bipartisan support, already been passed out of the agriculture committee, passed out of the house of representatives by 300 votes, but it has yet to be brought to the senate floor for debate. that debate could being over with in half an hour the majority leader talks about bipartisan support for legislation and hurdles to bringing bipartisan legislation to the floor. obviously we have them. but i want to remind the senate that this bill has already passed the house, as i have said, with broad, bipartisan support, and again with over 300 votes. that doesn't happen often in the house of representatives these days. and it passed out of the senate ag committee with bipartisan support, didn't even need to have a hearing. but yet the majority leader has not allowed this come to to the floor without a vote. i would urge him to do that. i am talk about h.r. about the g regulatory burdens act of 2011. how could anybody be opposed to
for everything he has done. [laughter] and now we can talk about the fiscal cliff. let me start off just by -- we will do the house rules, except we will cut in half. 30 seconds -- then we will have time to elaborate on all this. i want to go through the panel. what do think the odds are that some kind of the deal will be cut by january 1 in order to avoid sequestration and all the tax hikes? mark, i will start with you. >> i think it is 80% that we will avoid sequestration. the question is, though, is this going to be a big enough deal, and will actually be enough of a down payment that it will lead to something else subsequently that will actually avoid the kind of enormous consequences of $16 trillion of debt? that percentage will be lower than the 80%. >> let's come back to the big picture -- in the short term, by january 1 -- will we avoid the cliff? >> i think it is likely that we avoid it. it does not appear that that is going so well. it is so easy for us just to do the things we need to do. i think the real line in the sand is going to be the debt ceiling. i really do think -- i have sai
discover, is worry about the debt and the fiscal cliff. our program today, just briefly, others will talk, and we will give the polling results, and then a senior national journal member will have a panel discussion. it is a terrific day, i think. please turn these off. and, again, i welcome you. joan is the executive vice president of the country's largest insurance. you are in good hands with all state. joan has been a terrific partner. she is responsible of corporate relations for allstate. she did civil -- similar work with monsanto and others. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist, which is what washington is all about, so thank you very much and welcome. [applause] >> ok. thank you. john, for that introduction. the national journal has been a terrific partner in supporting our work and the challenges that the american middle-class has been facing during this great recession, and i thank them for that. many thanks also to end, who will take us through the polling data to date -- many thanks take us through the polling data today, as well as one of his associates
stories. >>> president obama and house speaker john boehner chatting by phone about the fiscal cliff. no details or word of progress or future talks with just 26 days remaining to get a deal done. another prominent republican is breaking ranks. tom coburn, a leading conservative and fiscal hawk saying he'd prefer raising taxes on the wealthy as a way to raise revenues. >>> a bitter turf war between twitter and instagram elle cl escalating. no one on twitter will be able to see the images posted on instagram. instagram's goal is getting people to post more photos on their site. >>> a man cannot have any more children until he shows proof that he can actually afford those children. 44-year-old corey curtis is charged with failure to support two of the nine children that he's fathered with six women. he owes $85,000 and says he is ready to abide by the judge's order. >> good idea. >> all right. the grammy nominations announced in style with a star-studded concert, jay z and kanye west were among the six artists tied for the most nominations, six apiece. the grammy awards ceremony, music
, alan blinder will join us to talk about the fiscal cliff and qe-4. not many hotels are being built in the country today. choice is breaking ground on three new hotels. they're also the originator of the obama special dividend. >> let's get six at 60, six stocks in 60 seconds. let's start with lions gate in gold man. >> i'm going for hunger games. gold man doesn't seem to care. >> this is a very hot stock. >>> it's a limb late. >> oppenheimer, buying a hold on auto zone. >> i thought it was a really good buy back. one of the hottest stocks for a long time. the big data, i would be careful. >> u.s. wine guard to sell. >> good yield, bricks and mortar, fine. here's a company that's going to be on tonight. i thought this call was really bad to say sell, i liked the quarter. but everybody's worried about retail and fiscal cliff, carl and fiscal cliff was mentioned in the release. it's become something carl that we are expecting in every release that we see. >> we do have a couple of seconds to point out that last night in cable fax awards, two nights ago, you were named to the hall of f
of dysfunctional people in washington d.c. and this fiscal cliff. you won't take my life. you won't take our future. aids affects us all. even babies. chevron is working to stop mother-to-child transmission. our employees and their families are part of the fight. and we're winning. at chevron nigeria, we haven't had a reported case in 12 years. aids is strong. aids is strong. but we are stronger. and aids... ♪ aids is going to lose. aids is going to lose. ♪ five days later, i had a massive heart attack. bayer aspirin was the first thing the emts gave me. now, i'm on a bayer aspirin regimen. [ male announcer ] be sure to talk to your doctor before you begin an aspirin regimen. [ woman ] learn from my story. >>> this week, we made a good faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis. now we need a response from the white house. we can't sit here and negotiate with ourselves. >> that is president obama and the democrats to save you for being higher taxes. >> this fiscal cliff thing, the problem with the republicans larry, is that they have been boxed in by the democrats into a difficult position where th
sat down with ted turner. we talk about everything from nuclear iran to the fiscal cliff. you're a successful person. you have many different ventures. do you think you should pay more as a wealthy american? do you think you should pay more taxes? >> yes. >> how much? >> you know, whatever's reasonable. >> that interview airing this time tomorrow right here on cnn newsroom. people have doubts about taking aspirin for pain. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. stop! stop! stop! come back here! humans -- we are beautifully imperfect creatures living in an imperfect world. that's why liberty mutual insurance has your back with great ideas like our optional better car replacement. if your car is totaled, we give you the money to buy one a model year newer. call... and ask one of our insurance experts about it today. hello?! we believe our customers do their best out there in the world, and
to a commercial break. we'll talk about our own dysfunctional people in washington, d.c., in this fiscal cliff. [ man ] in hong kong, on my way to the board meeting... anne's tablet called my phone. anne's tablet was chatting with a tablet in sydney... a desktop in zurich... and a telepresence room in brazil. the secure cloud helped us get some numbers from my assistant's pc in new york. and before i reached the top, the board meeting became a congrats we sold the company party. wait til my wife's phone hears about this. [ cellphone vibrating ] [ female announcer ] with cisco at the center, working together has never worked so well. >>> this week, we made a good faith offer to avert the fiscal crisis. now, we need a response from the white house. we can't sit here and negotiate with ourselves. >> house speaker boehner saying that is president obama and the democrats to save you for being higher taxes. this fiscal cliff thing, the problem with the republicans, larry, is that they have been boxed in by the democrats into a difficult position where the polls confirm that the public in america bel
the fiscal cliff. i don't know what shall is talking about. 14.3% if you make the millionaires new price range of $250,000, so, people are leaving. talk to a surgeon the other day, closed up shop, sold his house and is leasing a home in las vegas. he says he couldn't take it anymore. stuart: but this is a historic reversal. look i've been in america 40 years and started out in san francisco 40 years ago and back in those days, there was always a net migration into california, significant numbers. california gained tens of millions of people over my time in america, but that just recently has been completely reversed. now there's a net leaving of people. and that's historic in america, that's historic. >> it is historic. it is historic because you come here, as i said for the weather, but that's it anymore and there's no promise of a future. don't promise that you're going to be able to put down your stake and really do something with it. look at the head of facebook, one of the partners left not only the state of california, left the united states of america because of the taxes going on
the fiscal cliff. they met face to face yesterday and susan mcginnis tells us the chances may be better with two people doing the negotiating. >> reporter: president obama leaves dc today headed to michigan to talk to auto workers, part of his strategic to gain support. the president and house speaker john boehner met one on one. no details were leaked, we know the main points remain, raising taxes on high earners and cutting programs like medicare. >> they've started to tango. more republicans are accepting the idea that wealthy americans will get a tax rate hike. >> there is a growing group of folks that are looking at this and realizing that we don't have a lot of cards as it relates to the tax issue before year end. >> reporter: republicans in the house remain opposed to raising taxes on the top 2%. >> the president wants the rate to go up. that doesn't solve the problem. we don't want to be b back here answering the same questions. >> reporter: the deadline is closer than you think. many here on capitol hill say the president and the house speaker need to make a deal by the end of
brownstein to talk about the fiscal cliff, job creation, and deficit reduction. >> let me introduce the moderator, ron brownstein. he is the editorial director of "national journal" and the "atlantic." he oversees political coverage coming out of our company. he writes a weekly column for "national journal" and is regularly on major cable networks and the real networks. dare i say, he is the most astute political analyst in washington. we have had changes. gene sperling at the last minute could not make it. there is a meeting going on right now, which may be productive -- maybe not. we have congresswoman allyson schwartz from pennsylvania, who has served on the ways and means committee in the house and now on the budget committee. she has become a big deal. we are happy to have you with us. >> thank you. gene was summoned a way for a meeting, which may or may not be good news on the fiscal front. i hope this will be less eventful than the last panel i moderated. i was at harvard where they do the debrief every four years with the senior campaign officials of both teams. we were in t
together for the good. you talk about the fiscal cliff. bring congress and they can back up their own stones. i would love to see boehner with a stone. >> for would be perfect. >> nice to see you. award season is coming up. >> what's award season. >> how many are you going to nab? >> i would like a couple of good movies. dustin hoffman is called that. 75-year-old first time director. >> i love it. >> i'm going to see it. >> the d is silent. >> great to see you. >> come tonight. >> always. the 12-12-12 concert at 7:30 p.m. the 121212 concert.org. what does it take to uproot one of the largest hotel empires? scott wapner gives us a look at this new documentary behind closed doors at marriott. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon... creamy cheese... 100 calories... [ chef ] ma'am [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on
to get the economy back on track. she was talking about about solutions to avert the fiscal cliff. if if you look at how we got here, nothing gets resolved out of washington, it's an abyss that doesn't need to happen. if you just go back and look at the promises made by poth because massachusetts when he was running for office, when he was running for re-election, he talked about working across the aisle he talked about bipartisan solutions he talked about it a lot and the american people expected that the president would keep that promise. but before the ink was even dry, before some of the states had confirmed and finalized their vote totals for this last election, the president comes out with a hyper partisan solution that's his approach. when the president comes out with his plan to raise taxes on some, not renew ores, to threaten middle class families with a tax increase if some people don't get their taxes raised, there already was a bipartisan solution to avert this cliff. just a few months ago, here in this house, we passed a bill with 19 democrat votes. a strong bipartisa
of negotiations over what is called the fiscal cliff. also, don't forget to explore the history and literary culture of new york capital city of albany this weekend. book tv is on c-span2 and american history to be on c-span three. >> coming up at 7:00 c-span will be lot of discussion unskilled immigrants. virginia senator mark warner is sponsoring a bill to allow more highly skilled veterans and to the u.s. >> we have had these this the five explosions of knowledge in madison, but we have not coordinated care. all the services that we have end up having some any cracks that the cracks are as harmful as the diseases that we are treating. we have to step back and ask, you know, are we hurting people overall? and income on a global level where we doing some times? and, of course, now we have to these reports saying 30 percent of everything we do may not be necessary in after. we will be step back, 30 percent of all the medications we prescribe, the tests we order, the procedures. this is something, i think, which is for the first time really being called out as a problem. >> dysfunction in the
expected to talk about the so-called fiscal cliff deal, but he may also weigh in on dan's just-passed right to work law and the big changes in store for a state considered the birthplace of organized labor. tomorrow the governor is expected to sign into law legislation that will bar unions from taking mandatory dues out of workers' paychecks, and many are asking how we got to this point in michigan of all states. joining me now, bernard whitman, former pollster for bill clinton and author of "52 reasons to vote for obama," or why people should be glad they voted for obama i guess after the fact, bernard, and also gretchen ham hamil. panel, welcome to you both. this is something. we've seen these right-to-work states becoming more and more popular, almost half the states in the night that are going right to work, but, gretchen, let me "street smart" with you on this -- start with you on this as a republican. >> well, you have to look at the past two years in michigan, some of the highest unemployment rates over the past two years reaching nearly 15% and currently 9.2%. so you see a state the
to 7.7%. that being shaded on what is going on with decisions by the fiscal cliff. another economic news this morning, a story in the wall street journal looking at general motors. it says -- earlier this year, 675,000 vehicles a in inventory. houston, texas, this is eric. caller: i am if first-time caller. years or 22 years old. i have spent of this entire year try to educate myself a lot more on the whole -- let me get right to the point. i think it should be a state decision. the supreme court should allow the states to make the kind of a decision. giving more people -- in giving more power to the government to regulate this on a national level will create so many issues down the road, and it probably a lot of issues in the immediate -- the reason we even got to this. is because we get some much power to the government to regulate all of the different things and issues. giving them more power is just going to create more problems. my basic thought is, more government power, more issues. host: we will leave it there. victor on the republican line. caller: i do not think the suprem
is "newsweek's" bureau chief and host of cnn's "reliable sources." the last time you were here we talked about how the white house and president was using social media's way of arguing this social -- this fiscal cliff argument. turns out he's not alone. let's look at something we've been seeing this week. >> stop instagramming your breakfast and tweeting your first world problems and getting on youtube so you can see gang 'nam style. ♪ gangnam style >> and start using those sprerbl social media skills to sign people up on this baby. three people a week, let it grow and don't forget, take part or get taken apart. these old coots will clean out the treasury before you get there. >> ifill: "these old coots will clean out the treasury." this is alan simpson in his best but a completely different venue. >> i talked to him today and he said "i think i could go around the world in 90 days and never had the impact that this silly little thing did." and the idea behind this, he's hooked up with "the can kicks back" helping young people try to get involved and get engaged in the fiscal cliff and makin
with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive about selling off those parts in order to unlock this hidden value.
about the future of labor? >>> but we begin with the latest on the fiscal cliff. republicans made another counteroffer but it's reportedly not much different from their first offer. though we don't have specifics, we do know the president and john boehner talked on the phone last night and that call, according to a republican familiar with it, was tense and lasted just 15 minutes. i want to bring in real clear politics reporter aaron mcpike and david hawkings, editor of the cq roll call daily briefing. good morning. so president obama sat down with barbara walters last night. here's what he said. >> most important thing we can do is make sure the middle class taxes do not go up on january 1st and i'm pretty confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high income individuals. >> so he's confident. is it almost a foregone conclusion, do you think, david, that this is going to be the first piece of the puzzle that falls into place? >> i'm pretty confident that that's going to have to be the first piece of the puzzle that falls i
about matters of the great interest to the country and has been very involved in the fiscal cliff negotiations and of course he of before he was senator he was a governor. then steve is the co-founder of america online. is a rabid twitter. i feel like i know every detail of your life. and a relentless of entrepreneurship. we're very fortunate to have these three panelistings. they get five to seven minutes -- there will be a little time left. five to seven minutes to discuss the topic and we're going have a discussion among us then we will open it up to you and hopefully, we will get to all of your comments and questions. >> i'm delighted to be here this evening because i think the topics is important. this conference also recognizes mark kaplan who is that i am pleased to speak in behalf of tonight. we're looking tonight at immigration policies and how they affect our eighty to attract high-skilled immigrants. engineers and entrepreneurs who contribute to innovation. because universities and colleges are in the talent business. we're in a global competition for talent. all yustse
things done. not limited to just worry about the debt and fiscal cliff and such. our program today just loosely, i'm welcoming you, obviously, joan walker's going the talk, ed reilly of sgi is going the give the polling results, and then ron brownstein of national journal is going to do our interview, and then we're going to have a panel discussion. so it's going to be a full and absolutely terrific day, i think. please, turn these babies off. and, again, welcome you. let me introduce joan walker. joan is executive vice president of allstate which is one of the country's largest insurance, we're in good hands with allstate, we all grew up with that. joan has been a terrific partner, in the last four years she's responsible for all corporate relations with allstate. prior to joining that company in 2005, she did similar work with monsanto and qwest. she is a consummate marketing and communications strategist which, of course, in this town of washington is really all about. so, joan, thank you very much, and we want to welcome our friends here. [applause] >> good morning, and thank you so
Search Results 0 to 38 of about 39 (some duplicates have been removed)